15183

FAMILY COMMONPLACE BOOK KEPT BY A PERSON WHO WAS LATER ONE OF THE VICTIMS IN A FAMOUS VICTORIAN DOUBLE MURDER

MOORE, George & family

A most interesting Manuscript Commonplace book of Poems & Songs

Published
London

Description
Large 4to volume containing 65 pieces, some of several pages, all tipped into a scrapbook with no covers.

£850.00

SKU: 15183

Product Description

The majority of the pieces were written by George Moore (c. 1795-1855), with some by his brother Thomas and daughter Caroline. They relate on the whole to family matters- birthdays, deaths or other events. One poem, ‘Farewell to Hoxton’ of September 1824 indicates the date the family moved from Hoxton to London’s Warren Street, where Moore established himself as a successful manufacturer of soda water. The poems vary in length from single sheets to several pages and include one on the death of Queen Caroline. Other items of note: ‘A Christmas Carol’, ‘Trip To Gloucestershire 1849’ (poem), several original songs (two with mss. music), ‘Acrostic on the Name of Moore’, ‘Blackheath Jaunts’ (1831 poem), ‘Sermon by a Benedictine Priest on Highwaymen’, and an autograph letter written to be sent on the very first day of penny post by stamp (5 December 1839). The religious content of much of the material is partly attributable to the fact that Moore and his siblings were from the family of Archbishop Moore. Tragically, at the age of 60 George Moore became the first of two victims shot to death by one Emile Barthelemy whose escape from the scene of the first crime was interrupted by neighbour Charles Collard- whose was also shot dead. Barthelemy was apprehended by passers-by, handed over to police to be tried at the Old Bailey, and then hung at Newgate on 22 January 1855. This double murder shocked and outraged the public of the time, and was even given extensive coverage in the New York Times. Also contains a loose holograph transcription dated March 3rd 1855 of an obituary notice from ‘the Gloucester paper’ of 27 January 1855 which asserts that some of Moore’s compositions were ‘well known, being adapted to music’.