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PRECOCIOUS GENIUS COMPARED WITH KEATS, BLAKE & CHATTERTON!

KNOWLES, Herbert

Lines Written in the Church-yard of Richmond Yorkshire, October 7th, 1816. (Printed Broadside, with contemp. Manuscript copy)

Published
(Richmond)

Description
Broadside, 4to., woodcut border, has been folded with some splits, laid down on album sheet, together manuscript written on 3 pages, plus blank page, written in a neat sloping hand, paper watermarked with ñBritanniaî watermark.

£350.00

SKU: 16470

Product Description

Herbert Knowles (1798-1817), poet, owes his reputation to this his only known poem which he sent to Robert Southey and which was originally titled ñThe Tree Tabernaclesî. •It would be difficult to overpraise this noble masterpiece of solemn and tender pathos, exquisite in diction and melody……… the stanzas are unparalleled as the work of a schoolboy for faultless finish and freedom from all the characteristic failings of inexperience. This extraordinary maturity discriminate Knowles from other examples of precocious genius, such as Keats, Blake and Chatterton, and insures him a unique pace among youthfull poets. (D.N.B) The poem was issued in a large circulation on a separate sheet (this example). The manuscript copy is on paper watermarked 1817, and may well precede a printed version. It is interesting to note that the transcriber has corrected the punctuation to improve the diction.